Pressure-Visualisation in the grip of a bow

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Orngrimm
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Pressure-Visualisation in the grip of a bow

Post by Orngrimm »

Some of you may know it: I am a quite passionate archer. Holder of many swiss records and since multiple years swiss champion in the "main" cathegory of Recurve, male.
Also, since 2007 a permanent member of the swiss national team A.

Our national coach asked me if it would be possible to somehow visualize the pressure of the hand in the bowgrip over time.
What will be especially interesting is the "critical moment" in between the clicker and the release + about 100ms after the release (Until the arrow left the string): What happens in this massive change of highest static pressure to highest dynamic pressure to complete separation (0 pressure) when the bow leaves the hand.
We managed to sample in about 10ms-intervals 6 pressure-sensors on a foil we positioned on the grip:
Image

With 0 knowledge of python i managed to cobble together about 100 lines of code to import the CSV with the pressure-data, interpolate it and display it in a 2D-gridplot over the image of the grip while the location of the sensor-points is correct (Datapoints location on graph = location of the sensor in reality on the grip).
Image

Next will be the animation of all the data i have in store. This image above is only ONE snapshot of the data (Sample 650 of 2400+). If someone is interested in my MESSY code, feel free to request it.
Builder of stuff, creator of things, inventor of many and master of none.
Tinkerer by heart, archer by choice and electronics engineer by trade.
Downunder35m
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Re: Pressure-Visualisation in the grip of a bow

Post by Downunder35m »

Well, I can't really make any use of your code due to my own lack of knowledge but I would love to hear how this goes on.
Did some archery for a few years myself when I was young but had to give up when relocating and work life started.

I guess all this research is to optimise for a better bow?
Exploring the works of the old inventors, mixng them up with a modern touch.
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Re: Pressure-Visualisation in the grip of a bow

Post by Orngrimm »

Not for a better bow. For a better shooting-sequence, form and control of the pressure-distribution in the grip.
Often we modify the grip slightly (like 1.5° more left-angled or such a thing). This should help us to understand what happens not only in terms of "how it feels" but what exactly happens during the acceleration of the bow.
Before, we could only take highspeed-videos and check the resulting movements of the bow during this phase. But the movement is influenced by a lot of other factors like the stabilisers and all its details or even the bracehight. With the pressure-data, we will be able to "see" how it behaves at the source.
Builder of stuff, creator of things, inventor of many and master of none.
Tinkerer by heart, archer by choice and electronics engineer by trade.
Downunder35m
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Re: Pressure-Visualisation in the grip of a bow

Post by Downunder35m »

Ok, I got it :)
Never thought shooting an arrow could become such a technical excercise.
I was happy to make the things work but did not really think about this level of dedication.
But then again, you are competing many classes above my former top level ;)
Exploring the works of the old inventors, mixng them up with a modern touch.
To tinker and create means to be alive.
Bringing the long lost back means history comes alive again.
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Re: Pressure-Visualisation in the grip of a bow

Post by Orngrimm »

With a 655 average on 70m Thats like hitting a DVD on 70m >50% of the time and the rest being in the ring 5cm around it, one has to start taking anatomical physics and a LOT of miniscule details into account.
Changing the brace height (Distance of string to handle while at rest) by 1mm even changes my groupsize by around 4%. So ... Yeah... Everything counts. And if you yerk the riser during release, be lucky if you get a 8 or 7 on 70m...
Builder of stuff, creator of things, inventor of many and master of none.
Tinkerer by heart, archer by choice and electronics engineer by trade.
Downunder35m
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Re: Pressure-Visualisation in the grip of a bow

Post by Downunder35m »

I guess that is why they call it a form of art once you advanced enough in this sport.
Quite interesting as well through what lengths some pros go in terms of mental preparation before a tournament.
For me it ended around the 30m mark but I went fully old school.
Never like the modern bows too much, so my prefered weapon was a wooden one with no extras or mods of any sorts.
Just some felt and a needle to get my aim.
Sometimes I still miss those old days....
Exploring the works of the old inventors, mixng them up with a modern touch.
To tinker and create means to be alive.
Bringing the long lost back means history comes alive again.
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Orngrimm
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Re: Pressure-Visualisation in the grip of a bow

Post by Orngrimm »

If you want to see my last swiss champion-Gold-Final, check over at
It was quite windy and my score was not the best... Missed quite some good rhythms there.
As a reference: The 10 (including the inner 10, the X) is 12.2cm in diameter. A DVD in size. Distance: 70m
Builder of stuff, creator of things, inventor of many and master of none.
Tinkerer by heart, archer by choice and electronics engineer by trade.
Downunder35m
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Re: Pressure-Visualisation in the grip of a bow

Post by Downunder35m »

You make it look sooooo easy LOL
But enjoyed watching it!
Always much nicer if yousee someone you know, especially if it is big win like this.
Bit late but : Congratulations! Well done indeed!
Exploring the works of the old inventors, mixng them up with a modern touch.
To tinker and create means to be alive.
Bringing the long lost back means history comes alive again.
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Orngrimm
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Re: Pressure-Visualisation in the grip of a bow

Post by Orngrimm »

it IS easy! :D
4 mayor steps with about 4-5 part of each step the archer does 2-3h per day in training, >1000 times a week, 60'000-100'000 times a year.

At such a level, the active brain is very often one of the biggest enemies of an archer.
a famous quote of a great coach:
"The archer has two taks in his carreer:
1: in training to teach the autopilot to shoot good shots
2: in competition not to interfere with the autopilot!"


True2 :lol:
Builder of stuff, creator of things, inventor of many and master of none.
Tinkerer by heart, archer by choice and electronics engineer by trade.
Downunder35m
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Re: Pressure-Visualisation in the grip of a bow

Post by Downunder35m »

Well, all I know is that while I was considered good enough by my teacher to move up to competition level, my brain was not ;)
I often spent hours on the range and when I got home I got not even put butter on bread anymore with my sore arms ROFL
Same story during my army times.
I knew I was quite good before I even started my army job.
Thanks to shooting a lot with my uncle....
But you know how it is if a little recruit on the first day of shooting traing claims his rifle is broken ;)
Don't know if you know the good old German army rifles - they had a drum to adjust for the various distances.
Mine was just bouncing around loose.
Towards the end of our training my rifle broke the belt and I was given another one for the last few rounds.....
At 200m not a single shot missed the inner ring of the target :(
But it was too late to be accepted for the sniper training ROFL

For me, bow and arrow was always more a fun thing, not something to compete with.
A bit like stepping back in time so to say.
For the good stuff I would use the rifle, if I wanted some good time I used the bow.
We have a few archery clubs somewhere, maybe I will take it up again once I have a proper job and no longer like to tinker....
Exploring the works of the old inventors, mixng them up with a modern touch.
To tinker and create means to be alive.
Bringing the long lost back means history comes alive again.
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