Where was  the cog wheel (gear wheel) first used.

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AussieAlf
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Where was  the cog wheel (gear wheel) first used.

Post by AussieAlf »

The ancient Greeks?  Or perhaps by Egyptian and Mesopotamian engineers?....sorry, wrong on all counts.
I stumbled across an interesting article in a magazine while waiting in a doctors surgery sometime back when magazines were available pre- covid days.
This completely blew my mind. I hope you also find this as interesting a read as I did.

https://shar.es/aoGbiJ
Downunder35m
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Re: Where was  the cog wheel (gear wheel) first used.

Post by Downunder35m »

Certainly interesting to know.
But only shows that observing nature is way better than destroying it for the sake of expansion and techonological development.

But if you mean when the first gears were used by humans you might get an even bigger surprise.
Currently the Antikythera mechanism is considered to be one of the oldest examples of fine mechaical gears used by humans.
The real age is still subject to debate, what is not would be the impossibility of it's existence.
But if you dig deep enough you can find older mentionings of things that could only be geared systems - originating from times when it thought humans did not even know the wheel....
Who knows, maybe one day we will figure out that we got it all worng and that answer to free energy and all technology we might need was right in front of our eyes all along.... ;)
Exploring the works of the old inventors, mixng them up with a modern touch.
To tinker and create means to be alive.
Bringing the long lost back means history comes alive again.
AussieAlf
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Joined: Fri Aug 07, 2020 5:51 am
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Re: Where was  the cog wheel (gear wheel) first used.

Post by AussieAlf »

I had never heard of the Antikythera mechanism so googled it and watched a very interesting video. It is simply amazing the technology they had centuries ago and was lost over time.
Got to give you credit Downunder on the knowledge you have acquired. I have read many of your blogs, and don't know how you find the time to research so many vast and completely different topics in such detail.
Downunder35m
Posts: 353
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2020 5:32 am
Location: Australia
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Re: Where was  the cog wheel (gear wheel) first used.

Post by Downunder35m »

Well, it is not as if I started just last week....
A lot of topics that interest me were added to my collection at times when a real library with real books was the only thing around.
When we finally got the WWW and much later proper search engines things were a bit easier.
Sadly that all changed when Youtube and Google came along.
All of a sudden most of time was wasted debunking fakes or the many hoaxes out there.

Problem with ancient tehnology is that both science and archeology fail to explain how those people were able to do what they did and where they got the required knowledge from.
From this Antikythera mechanism or some of the clocks from the ancient Arabian world we only know that they existed, we managed to make some good replicas as well - check Dubai for those.
But the problem is that at the time when those things were created people (according to history and science) had no clue about gears, the wheel, let alone stellar constallations we only discovered with a telescope hundreds of years later.
It is this gap or missing link if you prefer that needs to be solved.
The question is not WHO invented the wheel - no one cares.
The question is: Where did the required knowledge come from at a time where we humans struggled to develop a written language....
Exploring the works of the old inventors, mixng them up with a modern touch.
To tinker and create means to be alive.
Bringing the long lost back means history comes alive again.
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